Saturday, March 13, 2010

Beech

Attractive forest trees native to eastern North America, Europe & in Asia; the Beeches grow stately as well as dense often with bare ground beneath. Shallow rooted, they are sometimes prone to uprooting in extremely high winds. Pruning is very important when young since it is only trees whos main limbs form narrow crotches, that are weak.
They prefer well drained soil in a somewhat protected environment and grow in sun to part shade ( except seedlings which need to be shaded ). They need moist conditions at least until becoming established however are moderately tolerant of air pollution.
Most Beeches thrive in both acidic and highly alkaline soil.
Before the Ice Age; Beech grew as far west as California and grew over most of North America. Today a subspecies survives in the mountains of Mexico. When Europeans settled North America; Beech forests used to cover limestone soil in Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana & Michigan. Most of this forest is now gone. The Beech nuts were a vital food supply for now extinct Passenger Pigeon.
Beech is generally resistant to Deer.
The wood is hard and also shock resistant making it useful for tool handles, mallets, parquet flooring, cabinetmaking and kitchenware. The wood gives off around 24 million Btu per cord when burned making it great for fuel. Oil produced from Beech nuts is as good as olive oil and stays sweet for a few years without refrigeration. To get the oil you boil the crushed nuts and skim the oil off the rising oil off the surface.
Beech require 2 times as much water for transpiration and growth as Oak however flooding can easily kill a Beech.
Any tree in the Oak & Beech family grown in a pot may suffer girdling roots. Inspect and unwind any such roots upon planting. Many transplants take 3 to 5 years to start growing vigorously again.
Young trees should be staked and trained to a central leader with the side shoots spaced and shortened the first few years. The best time for pruning is in December.
Propagation is from freshly sown seed or by grafting for the cultivers. The seed can be sown during autumn or stratified for 3 months at 40 F.
Beechdrops are a perennial that survive solely on the root systems of old growth Beech yet never actually damage the parent plant. In interesting article link ( http://www.wvdnr.gov/wildlife/magazine/archive/08fall/Vol8No2msfBeechdrops.pdf )
* photos of Beechdrops taken on Sep 22 2016 along the Patuxent River, Laurel, MD


Fagus crenata ( Siebold Beech )
A moderate growing, dense, spreading, deciduous, large tree, reaching up to 90 feet, that is native to Japan. It is an important timber tree within its natural range. The largest it can reach in 20 years is 50 feet and the largest ever recorded is 140 x 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 9 feet. Long-lived, it can survive for up to 600 years.
The wavy-margined, oval leaves are up to 5.5 x 3 inches in size. The foliage is furry at first, later only furry on the veins beneath. The foliage is deep green above, pale green beneath; turning to deep golden-yellow or red during autumn.
The smooth bark is silvery-gray.
Hardy from zone 4 to 8; this tree prefers hot humid summers but has reached 90 feet in cool summer Ireland.

* photo taken on April 11 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum


* photos taken on May 1 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.




* photo taken on May 8 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.

* photos taken on August 3 2010 @ University of Guelph Arboretum, Ontario


* photo taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, Washington, DC

* photo taken on Apr 24 2016 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photos taken on Sep 3 2017 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.


Fagus engleriana ( Chinese Beech )
A moderate growing, large tree, reaching up to 80 feet, that is native to central China. Some records include: 20 years - 40 x 20 ( possibly 50 ) feet; largest on record - 82 x 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 6.5 feet or possibly even larger. While very rare in the U.S. one planted at Morris Arboretum in Philly is already nearly that size. The Chinese Beech often forks low into a multi trunked tree.
The wavy-margined, ovate or elliptical leaves are up to 5 x 2 inches in size. The foliage is bright green above, somewhat silvery below; turning to orange during autumn.
Hardy zone 4 to 8, prefers hot humid summers and grows very well in the eastern U.S. & Ontario, Canada

Fagus grandifolia ( American Beech )
A Massive very stately tree with smooth silvery bark, the American Beech is native to eastern Canada & U.S. ( from western Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to Batchewana to Chalk River, Ontario to southeast Quebec to Newfoundland; south to eastern Texas to northern Florida ). In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was locally common from Amherstburg to Leamington but did not occur at Point Pelee during the 1800s. It also occured on the Lake Erie islands at that time however it no longer occurs there in the wild. It occurred sporadically at Detroit during presettlement era. The American Beech is a very important forest tree, also growing in cultivation where not bothered by soil compaction, wind and salt. It is a medium growing tree usually to 30 feet in 20 years though 66 x 50 feet has been reported for that time period. At maturity trees in the origional old growth forests lived to 400 years and reached truly gigantic sizes ( 200 x 70 feet with trunks up to 12 feet across, 183 x 70 feet largest recorded for Maryland ). The American Beech once formed massive groves in Ohio, Indiana, Illinois & Kentucky and its seeds fed massive flocks of the now extinct passenger pigeon. Generally nowadays one 100 feet tall with a trunk 4 feet across is considered large. In the U.S. the largest tree currently grows in Harwood, MD and in Canada, the largest tree is at Springwater Conservation Area in Elgin County, Ontario. Trees have exceeded 100 feet in height in the mildest parts of England.
The foliage is bright verdant green in spring turning to shiny dark green above & paler beneath. They turn orange in late fall with the leaves often drying and lasting well into the winter. The leaves are typically up to 6 x 3 inches in size though can be as much as 9 x 5.5 inches on vigorous shoots.
The small yellow flowers occur in small clusters up to an inch in mid spring.
The fruits are 1 to 3 small edible nuts enclosed in a bristly husk up to an inch in size. The nuts can be eaten fresh after removing the shells.
The bark is light gray and smooth.
The American Beech must be transplanted while very small to avoid transplanting shock ( which means years of slow or no growth ) and it is recommended to plant seeds from locally native trees ( an American Beech transplanted from Goderich, Ontario probably won't grow in Orlando, Florida or vice versa ). Some seedlings develop leaf clososis on alkaline soil and others do well and this is all the more reason to use trees from local supply. If American Beech grow in your neighboorhood then the seedlings should do well in your yard as long as they do not have to compete with sod or lack of water in their early years.
The American Beech is hardy from zones 3 - 9 ( - 40F ) covering mass territory, however in landscapes the European Beech and cultivars of it are more common and withstand more adverse conditions. The American Beech does not grow well in much of the British Isles with its cool summers ( European Beech however does thrive there ).
The American Beech seems to require mycorrhizal inoculum from local native beech stand to make rapid growth.
The American Beech does not enjoy soil compaction, road salt or excessive wind.
Unfortunately many American Beech in the wild have been killed by a parasites accidently introduced from Europe
http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/fidls/beechbark/fidl-beech.htm





* photo taken @ U.S. National Arboretum on August 2005


* photo taken on April 18 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.



* photo taken on May 8 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.


* photos taken on May 16 2010 @ Cylburn Arboretum, Baltimore, MD


* photos taken on June 1 2010 in Columbia, MD


* photos taken on 4th of July 2010 in Washington, D.C.






* photos taken on Nov 13 2011 in Columbia, MD




* photo taken on May 7 2012 in Columbia, MD
* photo taken on June 18 2012 in Ellicott City, MD

* photos taken on Nov 16 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Oct 31 2013 @ Hampton Ntl. Historical Site, Towson, MD

* photo taken on Mar 15 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 15 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken by W.R. Mattoon @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historical archive photo

* photo taken on Aug 3 2014 @ National Zoo, Washington, DC

* photos taken on on Aug 26 2014 in Towson, MD

* photos taken on Nov 10 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Feb 8 2015 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photo taken on May 18 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Nov 2 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Apr 17 2016 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photo taken on July 16 2016 in Bayfield, ON

* photos taken on Sep 22 2016 @ Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, MD

* photo taken on June 15 2017 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Aug 13 2017 @ Howard Comm. College, Columbia, MD

* historical archive photos

* photo taken on July 27 2015 in Bayfield, ON


subsp. 'Mexicana' ( Mexican Beech )
With an isolated natural range in the high mountain cloud forests of northeast Mexico little is known of this tree other than it is similar to Fagus grandifolia ( American Beech ).
It can reach up to 133 x 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 4 feet and is more drought tolerant than other Beeches.
Foliage is similar to but smaller than American Beech reaching up to 3.2 x 2 inches.
It is hardy north to zone 7 in the U.S. and has grown slowly to 9 feet tall in 10 years in North Carolina. More testing should be done on this tree to determine its landscape potential.

Fagus japonica ( Japanese Blue Beech )

Native to Japan in the mountains of Honshu, Kyushu & Shikoku. A moderate growing deciduous, large tree usually reaching up to 40 feet in 20 years and eventually 82 ( rarely over 60 ) feet. The largest on record is 100 x 100 feet and the fastest recorded growth rate is 3 feet. It is often multiple-trunked
The wavy-margined, oval leaves are up to 5 inches in length. They are furry on both sides when young and remaining softly hairy below. The foliage matures to glossy deep green above, bluish-white beneath; turning to orange during autumn.
The smooth bark is dark blue-gray.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 and requires hot humid summers.

* photos taken on May 27 2017 @ Meadowlark Botanical Gardens, Vienna, VA


var. multinervis
A subspecies that is native to Korea.

* photo taken on March 28 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.



* photo taken on May 1 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum

* photos taken on Sep 3 2017 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.


Fagus longipetiolata
Native to southeast China and Vietnam and reaching up to 82 feet in height with the record being 140 feet. Threatened with extinction.
The smooth-edged, ovate-oblong leaves are up to 6 inches in length. The glossy bright green foliage turns to bright yellow during autumn
Hardy north to zone 5.

Fagus lucida
A moderate growing tree, reaching a maximum height of 82 feet, that is native from central to eastern China. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 3 feet.
The lightly-toothed, ovate leaves are up to 5 x 2 inches in size. The glossy bright green foliage appears early during spring.
Hardy zones 6 to 8.


Fagus orientalis ( Oriental Beech )

Native from Romania, Bulgaria and the Balkans to the Caucasus where it once covered vast areas of Greece, Turkey and northern Iran, forming great forests especially at lower altitudes than F. sylvatica. This Beech grows into a very large handsome tree. It is fast growing and can reach up to 55 feet in 20 years and eventually over 100 feet. The largest on record is 170 x 80 feet with a trunk diameter of 10 feet.
The untoothed, wavy-margined, prominently veined, oval leaves are large, up to 8 x 5 inches in size. They have up to 12 pairs of veins where Fagus sylvatica English Beech has less than 10. The foliage is dark green and smooth above & silky hairy below turning to orange in autumn often hanging onto dried foliage in the winter.
The mid spring flowers are small & yellow in clusters in mid spring.
The fruits include 1 to 3 small edible nuts encasted in a bristly husk up to 1 inch in size.
The buds are orange and up to an inch in length.
The light gray bark is furrowed and smooth.
Hardy zones 4 to 8

* photos taken on May 1 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC



* photos taken on August 3 2010 @ University of Guelph Arboretum, Ontario




Fagus sylvatica ( European Beech )

Native to southern England and most of mainland Europe, it can become a large tree often exceeding 100 feet. Many huge spectacular trees grow in Europe and the largest Purple Beeches ever recorded reach up to 182 x 160 feet with trunk diameters up to 12 feet! A tree of 17o feet currently grows in Romania. Very long-lived, the European Beech can live up to nearly 500 years. Some records include: growth rate - 4 feet ( Scranton, PA ), first year - 8 inches; 5 years - 13 feet, 15 years - trunk diameter of 10.3 inches; 20 years - 50 feet; 30 years - 53 x 40 feet; 38 years - 50 x 60 x 1.5 feet; 60 years - trunk diameter of 2.4 feet; 105 years - 6.3 feet in trunk diameter. In the U.S.; a very large tree of 133 x 80 x 5 feet grows at Morris Arboretum in Philly. Other very large trees grow at Belfast, ME - 100 x 80 x 5.7 feet; Pomfret, CT - 100 x 80 x 7.2 feet; Swarthmore & Longwood, PA & Gull Lake, Michigan - 95 x 83 x 5 feet. The Canadian record grows at St. Andrews Church in Grimsby, Ontario - 86 feet in height & 5.3 feet in diameter. The European Beech grows with a dense canopy and casts heavy shade. Conical when young, it becomes domed and spreading with age. It can live up to 400 years in age.
Foliage is silky haired at first becoming strongly veined. The oval leaves, up to 5 inches or rarely 7 x 3 inches in size, are untoothed with wavy margins. They appear early in spring when they are verdant light green, later turning to glossy dark green above & paler green below. The foliage turns glowing gold to orange late in autumn eventually drying and turning to light brown and often hanging on the trees sometimes until April.
The small, yellow, mid-spring flowers are borne in clusters up to 3 inches in size.
The fruits are prickly.
The bark is smooth & gray. The timber is valuable.
Hardy zones 3 to 8. The European Beech does not like root disturbance and can be slow gorwing following transplanting. It grows well in sun or part shade on deep, moist, fertile, well drained soil and is heat & storm tolerant. The shallow fibrous roots prefer to be mulched but are very tolerant of alkaline as well as acidic soil. Insect pests and diseases rarely bother the European Beech.

* photos taken @ Bayfield, Ontario in park overlooking Lake Huron on Aug 2007

* taken in Wilkes-Barre, PA on July 2009


* photos of unknown source on internet



* photo taken on May 1 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.

* photo taken on August 2 2010 in Bayfield, Ontario

* photo taken on July 18 2016 in Bayfield, ON

* historical archive photos


'Albovariegata'
White variegated foliage on a tree reaching up to 90 feet tall with a trunk diameter up to 4 feet. Slow growing, it averages around 8 x 4 feet in 10 years.


'Asplenifolia'

The fine textured long, narrow, pointed leaves are narrowly lobed.
They are lush deep green in summer turning to orange-golden in fall.
Fast and dense growing to 27 + x 18 feet in 15 years - the largest on record is 120 x 90 feet with a trunk diameter of 5.5 feet. Some very large trees grow in Westport, CT & Highland Park in Rochester, NY. The Canadian record is at Prospect Cemetary, Toronto.
Propagated by budding in late summer.

* photos taken on May 16 2010 @ Cylburn Arboretum, Baltimore, MD




* photos taken on August 4 2010 @ Birnam Woods Arboretum, Stratford, Ontario



* photo taken on Sep 20 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Oct 15 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Nov 18 2016 in Columbia, MD

* historic archive photos


'Aurea Pendula'
Weeping with golden yellow spring foliage that later turns to green in summer. Fall foliage is orange. Averaging 12 x 3 feet in height in 10 years. Eventually to 42 x 6 feet with great age. Needs to be trained with the leader staked up when young.

'Black Swan'
Tall, narrow, very weeping tree with very dark purple foliage. It can reach up to 15 x 3 feet in 10 years, eventually to 25 x 13 feet or more.

* photo taken on July 25 2015 @ Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario


'Cuprea'
The lightest colored of the Purple Beech being copper in color.

'Dawyck'

An upright tree similar in habit to the Lombardy Poplar reaching up to 16 x 4 feet in 10 years; 27 feet in 15 years, eventually to 60 x 15 feet with the record size being 100 x 37 feet. Growth rate is moderate to 2 feet per year and on ideal sites sometimes fast.
The foliage is glossy mid-green.
Can grow true from seed.

* photo of unknown source on internet



* photo taken @ Smithsonian Inst, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014

* photo taken on July 25 2015 @ Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario


'Dawyck Gold'
Dense and columnar to 75 x 50 feet in size. It is similar to Dawyck but with foliage that is bright yellow in spring turning to yellow-green then to orange or gold in autumn..
Propagated by budding in late summer.

'Dawyck Purple'
A narrow dense columnar tree similar to 'Dawyck' but with very deep purple foliage that turns to orange in fall. Moderate growing to 2 feet per year ( fast on ideal sites ) and the largest on record is 90 x 15 feet. It can be raised true to form from seed.
Propagated by budding in late summer.



* photo taken on July 25 2015 @ Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario

* photos taken on June 2015 in Harford Co., MD

* photos taken on June 18 2016 in Harford Co., MD

* photo taken on July 16 2016 in Bayfield, ON

* photo taken on Nov 12 2016 in Harford CO., MD

* photo taken on Aug 5 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* photos taken on Nov 9 2017 in Harford Co., MD


'Laciniata'
Similar to 'Asplenifolia' but with leaves not as deeply cut.
Vigorous in habit.

* photos taken on May 16 2010 @ Cylburn Arboretum, Baltimore, MD



* historical archive photos

* photo taken on Nov 19 2016 @ London Town Gardens, Edgewater, MD


'Latifolia'
larger broader leaves than average reaching up to 7 x 5.5 inches

'Pendula' ( Weeping Beech )
Strongly weeping with thick branches and a heavy crown. Eventually a large tree with the largest trees on record reaching up to 110 x 90 feet and 7 feet in trunk diameter. One Weeping Beech was even reported to grow 100 x 115 feet in 200 years.
Fast growing, the fastest growth rate recorded is 4 feet though often slow to establish and add height, often no more than 16 feet tall in a 10 year period. Some additional records include: 10 years - 15 x 8 feet; 20 years - 33 feet; 45 years - 55 x 60 x 3.5 feet. A truly spectacular weeping tree!
The foliage is similar in shape and size to F. sylvatica and is bright green and silky in spring turning to deep green then to golden yellow during autumn.
Reproduced usually by grafting onto tall stock.

* photos of unknown source on internet


* photos taken on May 16 2010 @ Cylburn Arboretum, Baltimore, MD

* photos taken on July 17 2010 @ Morris Arboretum, Philly, PA









* photo taken on Sep 8 2012 in Harford Co., MD

* photo taken on July 26 2015 @ Niagara Parks Bot. Gardens, Niagara Falls, ON

* photos taken on Nov 28 2015 in Dauphin, PA

* historical archive photos


'Purpurea ( Purple Beech )
The original Purple Beech in which 'Riversii' is a nearly identical form with improved deeper purple foliage.

* photo taken in Wilkes-Barre, PA on July 2009


* photo of unknown source on internet

* photos taken on July 16 2016 in Goderich, ON

* historic archive photo


'Purple Fountain' ( Purple Fountain Beech )
Strongly weeping and vigorous with a strong upright leader. Averaging 14 feet in height in 10 years, on ideal sites it can grow much faster to 25 feet in 10 years, 27 feet in 15 years. One tree in Clarksville, MD added 4 feet in height during the 2009 growing season. Eventually it can reach around 35 x 15 feet in height with the maximum size possible being 82 x 50 feet. The very attractive foliage is deep red during spring turning to glossy dark purple during summer.

* photos taken from Clarksville, MD design / install jobsite






* photos taken on Aug 3 2012 @ University of Western Ontario, London, ON

* photo taken on July 10 2013 in Columbia, MD
* photo taken on Aug 4 2013 in Bayfield, Ontario

* photo taken on Oct 5 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 26 2016 in Mt Airy, MD

* photos taken on Aug 5 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


'Purpurea Pendula'
Weeping with purple foliage however unlike 'Purple Fountain'; this cultivar does not have a strong upright central leader. Much lower growing, reaching up to 6 x 4 feet in 10 years, with the largest on record being 20 x 37 feet, usually less than half that.



'Red Obelisk' ( Red Obilisk Beech )
Very dense columnar habit to 15 x 4 feet in 10 years and eventually up to 60 x 10 feet. Moderate growing, it can grow up to 2 feet in a year. The foliage is red-purple. Makes an excellent street tree for narrow streets and allee ways.

* photo taken on July 25 2015 @ Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario


'Riversii' ( Rivers Purple Beech )

A massive tree with some of the largest ever recorded reaching up to 120 x 105 feet and 9 feet in trunk diameter. In 105 years it can reach up to 6.3 feet in diameter.
Some large trees include: Baltimore, MD - 120 x 70 x 5.5 feet; Windham, CT - 91 x 105 x 7.6 feet & Portland, OR - 110 x 120 x 6 feet in 100 years.
The Canadian records are: Queen Street in Kingsville, ON - 120 x 60 x 5 feet & next to the chapel at Ridley College in St. Catherines, Ontario.
The best of all the Purple foliaged forms with foliage that is burgundy in spring turning to glossy purple to almost black by late summer.
Can be grafted but it often comes true from seed ( raise from seed and discard the ones without the intense purple foliage ). When regular green Fagus sylvatica Beech seedlings are planted - 1 in 1000 turn out to have purple foliage.

* photos taken @ Dumbarton Oaks, D.C. on August 2001



* photo taken @ Ellicott City - Old Towne on March 2005

* photo taken on April 18 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum

* photos taken on May 1 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.




* photos taken on May 16 2010 @ Cylburn Arboretum, Baltimore, MD




* photos taken on May 2 2010 in Bayfield, Ontario

* photo taken on August 4 2010 @ Birnam Woods Arboretum, Stratford, Ontario

* photos taken on August 5 2010 in Clinton, Ontario


* photos of unknown internet source



* photos taken on Aug 2 2012 in Bayfield, Ontario

* photos taken on Aug 4 2013 in Bayfield, Ontario

* photos taken on July 25 2015 @ Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario

* photos taken on July 27 2015 in Bayfield, ON

* photo taken on July 16 2016 in Bayfield, ON

* photo taken on May 27 2017 @ Meadowlark Botanical Gardens, Vienna, VA

* photo taken on Jul 18 2017 @ Dominion Arboretum, Ottawa, ON


'Rohanii' ( Rohan Beech )
Foliage is lobed like Quercus michauxii Swamp Chestnut Oak with pointed tips. The leaves are up to 4 inches long, red in spring turning to glossy deep purple in summer then to orange late in autumn.
Vigorous, dense & fast growing up to 3 feet per year; the largest on record is 100 x 80 feet. Slow to establish, it will often only be about 15 feet in 10 years, but faster growing after.
Very heat tolerant.

* photo taken on July 25 2015 @ Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario


'Rohan Obelisk'
Narrow and columnar in habit, it reaches an average of 15 feet in 10 years, eventually becoming very tall but only 15 feet wide.

* photos taken on May 6 2010 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD



* photos taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


'Rotundifolia' ( Rotundifolia Beech )
Slow growing and dense, with strongly upswept branches, it can eventually reach up to up to 100 x 60 feet. Some records include: 10 years - 10 feet; 45 years - 43 x 41 x 3 feet. An extremely beautiful tree. Leaves are smaller than average, dark green and rounded turning to orange in autumn.

'Swat Magret'
Very similar to 'Riversii' but comes into leaf in spring 10 days earlier and also keeps its leaves later into fall. The very attractive foliage is pinkish at first, quickly turning blackish-red and retaining it's color all season long. The leaves are larger than 'Riversii and other purple foliaged cultivars.

* photo taken on July 16 2016 in Goderich, ON


'Tortuosa' ( Parasol Beech )
Twisted branches and reaching up to 4 x 10 feet in 10 years, eventually developing a more upright habit and reaching a maximum of 40 x 40 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet. Slow to moderate growing, it tends to grow about 1 foot per year
The deep green foliage turns to orange in autumn.

'Tricolor' ( Tricolor Beech )
Averaging 30 feet in 20 years and eventually reaching up to 50 feet ( record is 100 x 65 feet ). A huge tree of 90 x 65 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet grows in Darien, CT.
The Tricolor Beech has purple foliage with pink margins that can fade to cream on hot sunny sites where unfortunately it can sometimes scorch.
hardy zones 4 to 7

* photo taken in Bayfield, Ontario on the shores of Lake Huron - Aug 2007

* photo taken at the Toledo Zoo, Toledo, Ohio on July 1992

* photos taken on May 1 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.



* photos taken on May 16 2010 @ Cylburn Arboretum, Baltimore, MD


* photo taken on June 6 2010 in Baltimore County, MD


* photos taken on June 17 2011 in Columbia, MD



* photos taken on July 25 2015 @ Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario

* historical archive photo



'Zlatia' ( Golden Beech )

The very glossy foliage is yellow in spring turning to bright green in summer then orange in fall.
Slower growing to 50 or rarely 80 x 50 feet.

ADDITIONAL AMERICAN BEECH PHOTOS @ Druid Hill Park, Baltimore, MD

@ Centennial Lake, Ellicott City, MD

1 comment:

  1. Randy, just a word to say that I frequently consult your blog and I find it invaluable and offering the most dependable and complete information I know of on the web. I am just an amateur gardener trying to make the most of a problem urban lot and not sure I'm doing too well at it. At my age I could just plant anything I fancy since, as my neighbours say, "it will be someone else's problem", but somehow I can't! I really appreciate the effort you put in this. Thank you!

    ReplyDelete