Wednesday, February 15, 2012

Jacaranda

Jacaranda
A genus of close to 50 species of both deciduous and evergreen, fast growing trees that are part of the larger Bignonia family. Most have bipinnate foliage but some are simple or pinnate. They can be either shallow or deep rooted but may be greedy feeders causing nearby plants to suffer from root competition.
The attractive, bell-shaped flowers are borne either during spring or summer.
The Jacarandas are mostly found in warm temperate, subtropical or tropical climates.
They require full sun on rich, well drained soil on a site protected from excessive wind. Jacarandas do not enjoy wet clay soils. They are very frost tender during the first few years ( covering with a blanket during the coldest clear nights may help when young ) though become somewhat hardier as they grow.
Transplanting is recommended during late winter while they are dormant.
Propagation is from seed that is soaked in water for 24 hours before sowing during late winter or early spring. They can also be grown from semi-ripe cuttings taken during summer which should be shaded until they root. The Jacaranda usually blooms in 5 to 7 years if grown from seed.

* photo of unknown internet source


Jacaranda acutifolia
A small tree, reaching up to 40 + x 40 feet. Some records include: 8 years - 20 x 13 feet.
The leaves are up to 18 inches in length.
Hardy zones 9a to 11.

Jacaranda caroba
A small to medium-sized, evergreen tree that is native to Central America and northern South America. Some records include: largest on record - 60 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet.
The pinnate leaves, up to 8 inches in length, are divided into up to 12 small leaflets, up to 1.5 inches in length. The leaves are used as a sedative in Guyana.
The violet, tubular flowers are borne during summer.
Hardy zones 10 to 11.

Jacaranda chelonia
A medium-sized, semi-evergreen tree that is native to Argentina. Some records include: largest on record - 100 x 60 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet.
The bipinnate leaves are divided into very numerous, tiny leaflets, up to 0.7 inches in length.
The purplish-blue flowers, up to 2 inches in length, are borne on clusters, up to 12 inches in length. They are borne during early spring, before J. mimosifolia comes into bloom.
The wood is used for cabinetry.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 ( tolerating 20 F ).

Jacaranda copaia
A very tall tree, reaching up to 150 ( averaging 100 ) feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet.
The huge, bipinnate leaves are the largest of the Jacaranda, reaching up to 66 x 28 inches in size. The leaves are divided into very numerous leaflets, up to 1 inch in length.
Hardy zones 11 to 12.

Jacaranda cuspidifolia
A small tree that is native to northern and central South America ( from Bolivia to Brazil; south to Paraguay and Argentina.
Some records include: largest on record - 40 x 30 feet.
The large, bipinnate leaves, up to 28 inches in length, are divided into leaflets, up to 2 inches in length. The ferny foliage is luxuriant mid-green.
The large, light blue flowers, up to 2 inches in length, are borne in larger clusters than those of Jacaranda mimosifolia.
They are followed by rounded, pale brown fruits.
Hardy zones 10 to 11

Jacaranda jasminoides
A medium-sized tree, reaching a maximum height of 60 feet.
This Jacaranda has no dormant period and may bloom throughout the year.
Hardy zones 10 to 12.

Jacaranda mimosifolia
A fast growing, wide-spreading, rounded, deciduous large tree, that is native to Brazil and northwest Argentina. Some records include: 2 years - 10 feet; 9 years - 35 feet; largest on record - 170 x 75 ( rarely over 70 ) feet with a trunk diameter of 6.3 feet. It is among the most beautiful of all tropical trees for streets and parks. The Mimosa Jacaranda is long-lived, exceeding 140 years. A very common tree, planted in many warmer regions around the globe including south Florida. It is among the most common trees in Pretoria, South Africa.
The bipinnate leaves, up to 24 x 9 inches, are divided into very numerous, tiny leaflets, up to 0.5 inches in length.
The fine-textured, mid-green foliage is deciduous during late winter after turning deep yellow.
The abundant, hanging, lavender, bell-shaped flowers, up to 2 inches in length, are borne on showy, terminal clusters, up to 12 inches in length. They are borne on the bare branches during spring before the new foliage emerges.
They are followed by reddish-brown seed-pods.
The furrowed bark is light gray.
The wood is sometimes used for timber.
Hardy zones 10 to 11 ( tolerating as low as 25 F and killed at temperatures of 20 or colder ) in full sun on light, well drained soil where yearly rainfall exceeds 36 inches. It is very drought tolerant, thriving in places such as central Chile, southern California, southern Italy, Greece and Isreal. It is also extremely heat tolerant, even thriving at Lake Havasu, Arizona with irrigation. Watering during early spring may cause the tree to leafout early thus hiding the blooms.
It thrives on soil of any PH up to 7.5, but is not salt tolerant.

* photo taken on Jan 11 2011 @ Deerfield Beach Arboretum, Florida

* photo of unknown internet source

* historic archive photos

* video found on Youtube




'White Christmas'
White flowers, otherwise identical. Can be planted in combination with the lavender flowered species.

Jacaranda obtusifolia
A broad-spreading, small tree that is native to tropical regions of South America.
Some records include: 3 years - 17 feet; largest on record - 60 feet.
The bipinnate leaves, up to 20 inches in length, are divided into very numerous, tiny leaflets, up to 0.6 inches in length. The feathery foliage is glossy green.
The blue-lavender, bell-shaped flowers, up to 2 inches in length, are borne on large heads during late spring.
Hardy zones 10 to 11.

Jacaranda semiserrata
A large tree, reaching up to 70 feet in height or sometimes more.
The very large bipinnate leaves are divided into small, ovate leaves.
The foliage is very luxuriant bright green.
The red-purple, tubular flowers are borne on large clusters during late spring into early summer.
Hardy zones 10 to 11.

Saturday, February 4, 2012

Purple Rock Cress

Aubrieta deltoidea
A mat-forming, evergreen perennial, reaching a maximum size of 16 inches x 4 ( usually much lower ) feet. It is popular as a landscape plant and always looks great trailing over a low stone wall. It is native to southeast Europe.
The small, toothed, wedge-shaped leaves are gray-green to mid-green.
The very abundant flowers, up to 1 inch across, range from pink to reddish-pink, violet or purple.They are borne during mid to late spring.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun on sandy, neutral to alkaline, well drained soil. Extremely cold hardy; it thrives as far north as Edmonton in Alberta. It may be short-lived in climates where extreme heat and drought occur. They should be cut back hard ( but not more than half way ) after blooming to maintain vigor. Plants grown from seed may be variable in bloom color.


* historic archive photo

* videos found on Youtube


* excellent photo link found on internet
http://plants.nature4stock.com/?page_id=514

'Argenteovariegata'
A mat-forming, evergreen perennial, reaching a maximum size of 4 inches x 3 feet.
The mid-green foliage is boldly variegated creamy-white.
The intense mid-blue flowers are borne during spring.

'Aurea'
A low growing, evergreen perennial, reaching up to 8 inches in height.
The foliage is edged in golden-yellow.
The blue-violet flowers are borne during spring.

'Bengal'
Mat-forming, evergreen perennials with either lavender, deep reddish-pink or purple flowers borne mid to late spring.

'Bob Saunders'
The double flowers are reddish-purple, it is otherwise identical to the species.

'Bressingham Pink'
The double flowers are pink, it is otherwise identical to the species.

'Bressingham Red'
The flowers are large and rosy-red, it is otherwise identical to the species.

'Dr Mules'
The flowers are deep blue-violet, it is otherwise identical to the species.
It sometimes reblooms during autumn.

'Greencourt Purple'
The purple flowers are large and double, it is otherwise identical to the species.

'Gurgedyke'
The flowers are deep purple, it is otherwise identical to the species.

'Red Carpet'
Bright red flowers.

'Royal Blue'
A mat-forming, evergreen perennial, reaching up to 6 inches x 3 + feet.
The flowers range from lavender to blue to violet.
It is among the best perennials for trailing over walls.

'Royal Red'
A mat-forming, evergreen perennial, reaching up to 6 inches x 2 + feet.
The flowers range from intense purplish-pink, red or purple.

* photo taken on Apr 6 2013 in Columbia, MD

'Variegata'
The foliage is green and edged in silvery-white, it is otherwise identical to the species.

'Wanda'
The flowers are double and bright red, it is otherwise identical to the species.

'Whitewell Gem'
A mat-forming, evergreen perennial, reaching a maximum size of 1 x 3 + feet.
The violet-blue flowers are borne during mid to late spring.

Vancouveria

Vancouveria

* excellent videos found on youtube


Vancouveria chrysantha
A creeping, evergreen perennial, reaching up to 16 inches in height, that is native to the western U.S. from southwest Oregon to northern California.
The leaves are oomposed of leaflets, up to 1.6 inches long. The foliage is deep green.
The white flower, up to 0.5 inches wide, are borne during early summer.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 in partial shade on a light soil.

Vancouveria hexandra ( Northern Inside-out Flower )
A vigorous, rhizomatous, semi-evergreen perennial, reaching up to 20 inches x 3 + feet, that is native to rich forests from northern Washington State to northwest California.
The leaves, up to 16 inches in length, are divided into up to 27 leaflets, up to 1 x 0.6 inches in size. The leathery foliage is bright green at first, later turning to mid-green.
The nodding white flowers, up to 0.6 inches wide, are borne late spring.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 ( possibly 4 on protected sites with deep winter mulch) in partial to full shade on moist, humus-rich, well drained soil. It is surprisingly heat tolerant in the southeastern U.S. It is even dry shade tolerant where summers aren't extremely hot. Prune out winter damaged foliage during early spring. Plants should be planted 2 to 3 feet apart in order to form an eventual groundcover. It is usually very slow growing while establishing during the first year but speeds up after that. Propagation is from division done during autumn or early spring.

* photo taken by The Wild Garden, www.nwplants.com


Vancouveria planipetala ( Redwood Ivy )
A creeping, evergreen perennial, reaching up to 20 inches in height, that is native to Pacific coastal forests from southwest Oregon to Monterey County, California.
The leaves are composed of 3 ( rarely 5 ), shallowly 3 to 5 lobed leaflets up to 1.5 x 1.5 inches in size. The leathery foliage is glossy deep green.
The 25 to 30, tiny, white to very pale purple flowers, up to 0.3 inches wide, are borne on upright clusters during late spring into early summer.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 in partial shade on moist, cool, fertile, humus-rich, well drained soil. In cold climates, it may become deciduous. Propagation is usually done by division during autumn or early spring.

Persian Shield

Strobilanthes

A genus of tropical perennials that are part of the larger Acanthaceae family.

Strobilanthes atropurpurea ( Hardy Persian Shield )
Also called Strobilanthes wallichii or Ruellia alata. An upright, large, clumping perennial, reaching up to 6.5 x 4 ( rarely over 5 ) feet in height, that is native to the Himalayas from Pakistan to China; south into southeast Asia.
The toothed, ovate to elliptical leaves, up to 6.5 x 2.5 inches in size, are luxuriant mid-green.
The bluish-purple, tubular flowers, up to 2 inches in length, are borne on dense spikes during mid-summer to mid-autumn.
Hardy zones 5 to 11 in full sun to partial shade on fertile, very well drained soil.

Strobilanthes dyer ( Persian Shield )
A tropical shrub, reaching up to 10 feet, that is native to Burma. Outside the tropics, it is grown as a perennial, reaching up to 6 x 5 feet, in zone 9. It is also used as a fast growing annual in temperate climates that is planted outside after the risk of frost has passed. An an annual, it will rarely exceed 3 feet in size.
In temperate climates it is most commonly seen in patio containers, mixed with blue or white flowering trailing plants.
The Persian Shield is very commonly seen in the U.S. in south Florida.
The thick leaves, up to 10 inches in length, are deep blue-green and richly variegated with bright purple. The foliage is solidly bright purple beneath.
The flowers are pale purple but rarely occur outside the tropics.
It thrives in partial shade on moist, fertile, humus-rich, well drained soil.
It is not tolerant of road salt or ocean salt breezes but is otherwise easy to grow anywhere summers are sufficiently hot and humid. As a perennial, it is only hardy to the 20s or on a very protected site 18 F.

* photo taken on Aug 25 2011 @ Scott Arboretum, Swarthmore College, PA

* photos taken on July 16 2012 in Ellicott City, MD

* photos taken on Aug 17 2012 in Ellicott City, MD

* photos taken on Sep 3 2012 in Ellicott City, MD
* photos taken on Sep 20 2012 in Ellicott City, MD

* photo taken on Aug 24 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014

* photos taken on July 25 2015 @ Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario

Valeriana

Valeriana

Valeriana arizonica
A dense, compact, mat-forming perennial, reaching up to 1 x 2 feet, that is native to the western United States.
It spreads due to its creeping rhizome.
The fleshy, oval leaves, up to 3 inches in length, are deep green.
The abundant, pale pink flowers are borne on corymbs up to 6 inches across, during early summer.
Hardy zones 5 to 7 in full sun.

Valeriana montana ( Dwarf Valerian )
A tufted, mat-forming perennial, reaching up to 10 x 10 inches. It is native to open montane woods and rocky slopes in high mountains in central Europe.
The basal leaves are entire yet the stem leaves are pinnate.
The pink or white flowers are borne on small, rounded clusters atop thick stalks during early summer.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 in full sun.

* historical archive photo


Valeriana officinalis ( Common Valerian )
A fast growing to invasive, clumping perennial, reaching a maximum size of 7 x 4 feet, that is a widespread native to temperate Eurasia. It has naturalized locally in eastern North America to as far north as Tobermory and Haliburton, Ontario as well as the Gaspe region of Quebec and Nova Scotia.
The compound leaves, up to 8 inches in length, are composed of lance-shaped leaflets, up to 2.8 inches in length. The foliage is pinkish at first, turning to mid-green.
The white to pink to purplish-pink flowers are borne on flat inflorescenes during mid to late summer.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on moist, fertile, acidic to neutral soil. Propagation is from seed or division during early spring.
Pharmacology: this is the Valerian that is often used in herbal sleep remedies.

* videos found on Youtube



Valeriana phu
A rhizomatous, woody-based perennial, reaching a maximum size of 5 x 3.3 feet, that is native to western Asia.
The broad leaves, up to 7 inches in length, are deeply-cut. The foliage is bright green at first, later turning to mid-green.
The white flowers are borne on huge dense panicles up to 2 feet across, from mid to late summer.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on just about any moist soil.

'Aurea'
The foliage is yellow at first, later turning to bright lime-green.

Valeriana sambucifolia
A fast growing, erect perennial, reaching up to 6 x 2.5 feet, that is native to Europe.
The pinnate leaves are composed of up to 19 toothed leaflets. The aromatic foliage is deep green.
The pale pink flowers are borne on branched flat heads during early summer.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 in full sun.

Valeriana saxatilis ( Dwarf Valerian )
A tufted, mat-forming perennial, reaching up to 8 x 8 inches.
The basal leaves are entire yet the stem leaves are pinnate.
The pink or white flowers are borne on small, rounded clusters atop thick stalks during early summer.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in full sun.

Valeriana sitchensis ( Sitka Valerian )
A perennial that is native to northwestern North America ( from Anchorage, Alaska to Fairbanks, Alaska to central Yukon to southwest Northwest Territories to Grande Cache, Alberta to central Montana; south to northwest California to southeast Idaho ).

* photo taken by Jean Pawek @ CalPhotos

* historical archive photo

Himalayan Parsley

Selinum tenifolium

An extremely long-lived, attractive, clumping perennial, reaching a maximum size of 6 x 2 feet, that is native to the Himalayas. It is related to Cow-Parsley and resembles it in appearance.
This is not the same as the garden parsley that is often eaten.
The extremely fine-textured, dissected foliage is deep green.
The lovely, large lacy white flower heads, up to 3 inches wide, are an added attraction. They are borne mid-summer to early autumn.
Thrives on moist fertile soil.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on moist, well drained soil.

Selinum wallichianum
A perennial, reaching up to 6 feet. Full text coming soon.

Ruellia

A genus of perennials, that are often referred to as "petunias" though are usually much more permanent, bushier and with colors in shades of blue.

Ruellia brittoniana ( Mexican Petunia )
A fast growing perennial, reaching a maximum size of 6 x 6.5 feet, that is native from southern Mexico to northern Argentina. It is now also running wild in the U.S. in parts of Texas, the Gulf Coast and in Florida.
The linear leaves, up to 12 x 0.8 inches, are luxuriant mid-green.
The violet-blue, petunia-like flowers, up to 3 inches long, are borne late spring through early autumn.
The flowers attract butterflies and hummingbirds.
Hardy zones 7 to 11 in full sun to partial shade on just about any soil, wet or dry, sand or clay. It performs very well in the deep south and on moist, fertile soil may become invasive. It is deer resistant. Propagation is from seed, cuttings or division after the first autumn frost.

* photos taken on May 28 2017 in Ellicott City, MD

* videos found on Youtube




'Chi Chi'
Vigorous but compact in habit, reaching up to 3 x 3 feet.

Ruellia carolinensis ( Carolina Wild Petunia )
A perennial, reaching up to 3 ( rarely over 1.5 ) feet in height, that is native to open woodlands in the southeastern U.S. ( from southern Illinois to New Jersey; south to central Texas to south Florida ).
The ovate or oblong leaves, up to 4.8 inches in length, are glossy mid-green.
The lavender-blue flowers, up to 2 inches in length, are borne late spring to late summer.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 in full sun to partial shade shade on either moist or dry, well drained soil.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historic archive photo

Ruellia humilis ( Wild Petunia )
A shrubby perennial, reaching a maximum size of 4 x 3 feet, that is native to dry woodlands in the midwest U.S. ( from central Nebraska to Michigan to central Pennsylvania to Maryland; south to central Texas to far northern Georgia ). It is not found on the Atlantic Coastal Plain and is endangered in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia.
The oval or oblong leaves are up to 4 x 1 inches in size, are mid-green.
The lavender-blue flowers, up to 3 x 2 inches in size, are borne all summer long. The flowers resemble petunias.
Hardy zones 4 to 9 in full sun to partial shade. Tolerant of reflected heat and dry shade.

* photo taken by Clarence A. Rechenthin @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photo taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014


'Blue Shade'
Reaches a maximum height of only 10 inches but is wide spreading in habit, rooting by creeping stems.

Ruellia peninsularis ( Desert Ruellia )
A fast growing, dense, evergreen shrub, reaching up to 5 x 6 feet, that is native to Baja California.
The small leaves, up to 1 inch long, are glossy bright green.
The purple, trumpet-shaped flowers, up to 2 x 1.5 inches in size, are borne spring into early summer, sporadically the remainder of the year.
The stems are bright gray.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 in full sun on well drained soil. In zone 9 freeze damaged wood will need to be pruned out during early spring.

Pinckneya

Pinckneya pubens
A very fast growing shrub or small tree, reaching a maximum size of 20 feet, that is native to swamplands from central Georgia to southeast South Carolina; south into northern Florida. It is endangered with extinction in the wild. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 5 feet; largest on record - 40 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.5 feet.
The oppositely-arranged, smooth-edged, elliptical leaves, up to 8 x 4.8 inches, are glossy mid-green.
The creamy-white, tubular flowers, up to 3 inches in length, are borne in clusters, up to 12 inches across, that include leaf-like pink bracts. While in bloom, it appears like a tree-like Poinsettia.
The flowers are followed by 2-celled, rounded brown capsules.
The scaly bark is light brown.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 ( it may tolerate temperatures as low as -10 F when grown as a perennial ). The Pinckneya thrives in full sun to partial shade on moist, fertile, light, acidic soil. In mild climates it may be trained as a single trunk tree by removing root suckers as well as removing lower branches during winter.

* historic archive photo


'Bostwick'
White flower bracts.

'Larry's Party'
The pink flower bracts persist over a long season lasting up to 6 weeks.

Paris

Paris
A genus of rhizomatous perennials, that are related to the Trillium.
These plants are poisonous, no part of them should ever be eaten.
They prefer a moist, shady, woodland environment. They are tolerant of limestone soils.

Paris chinensis
Also called Paris polyphylla var. chinensis. A perennial, reaching a height of 6 feet or more, that is native to southern China, Taiwan, Burma, Thailand, Laos and Vietnam.
The upright stems bear a handsome whorl of 5 to 11 large leaves at a height of 5 feet.
Hardy zones 6 to 10 in partial to full shade. It is recommended for the southeastern U.S.

Paris polyphylla
A perennial, reaching a maximum size of 3.3 x 2 feet, that is native from India, Nepal and Tibet to eastern China.
The upright stems bear a handsome whorl of oval leaves up to 8 x 2 inches in size. The leaves are borne in whorls of 6 to 10. The foliage is deep green.
The yellow and green ( with violet-purple stigmas ) flowers, up to 4 inches in length, are borne during summer.
They are followed by red fruits.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 in partial to full shade on just about any moist, humus-rich soil.

Paris quadrifolia ( Herb Paris )
A fast growing perennial, reaching a maximum size of 16 inches x 2 feet, that is native to moist woodlands of much of northern Europe, Siberia, Mongolia and northern China.
The leaves are up to 6 ( rarely over 5 ) x 2 inches in size. The ovate or obovate leaves are borne in whorls of 4 or rarely 5.
The yellowish-green flowers are borne during late spring to early summer.
They are followed by dull blue berries. The berries are poisonous.
Hardy zones 2 to 7 in partial to full shade on cool, moist soil.

* photos of unknown internet source


Paris verticillata
A perennial, reaching a maximum size of 3 x 2 feet, that is native to Siberia, Mongolia, north-central to northeast China, Korea and Japan.
The upright stems bear a handsome whorl of 4 to 8 oblanceolate leaves up to 7 x 2 inches in size. The foliage is mid-green.
The yellow and green ( with violet-purple stigmas ) flowers, up to 4 inches in length, are borne during summer.
They are followed by black fruits up to 0.6 inches wide.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial to full shade on just about any moist, humus-rich soil.

Cliff Green

Paxistima canbyi
Also called Canby Paxistima. A rare, slow stolon spreading, low evergreen, groundcover shrub, reaching up to 1 foot in height, that is native to the Appalatian Mountains in the eastern U.S. ( West Virginia and Virginia ) where it is endangered with extinction. Some records include: 3 years - 1 x 3.5 feet. It makes an excellent low edging hedge.
The small, toothed leaves are up to 1.3 inches in length. The fine-textured foliage is leathery and glossy deep green, turning to bronze during winter.
The flowers and fruits are very small and are not very showy.
The stems are square.
Hardy zones 3 to 7 in full sun ( or partial shade in hot summer climates ) on dry, acidic, very well drained soil only. It has survived in trials at Dominion Arboretum in Ottawa, Canada but only on protected sites such as an east facing wall, further south in Ontario it is more tolerant of environmental stresses. It is tolerant of wind and salt breezes making it a good plant for seaside areas. It is usually found on poor soil over shale rock in the wild and can be easily killed or stunted by chemical fertilizers. Cut back hard every few year to maintain vigor and dense habit.

Paxistima myrsinites ( Oregon Boxwood )
A dense, spreading, evergreen shrub, reaching a maximum size of 4 x 6 ( rarely over 2.5 ) feet, that is native to forests of western North America ( from Kitsault, British Columbia to Prince George, B.C. to Banff National Park, Alberta; south to central California to northern New Mexico ). Some records include: 3 years - 2 x 5 feet; 20 years - 4 x 6 feet.
The oppositely-arranged, toothed, oval leaves are up to 1.3 inches in length.
The leathery, foliage is bright green at first, later turning to glossy deep green.
The flowers and fruits are very small and are not very showy.
The stems are square.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 ( requires a site protected from wind in zone 4...some populations may be hardy to 3 ) in partial shade on moist, acidic, well drained soil. It is tolerant of wind and salt breezes making it a good plant for seaside areas.
Cut back hard every few year to maintain vigor and dense habit. Propagation is from seed or cuttings.

* photos taken by Jean Pawek @ CalPhotos

* photo taken by http://www.nwplants.com

Black Foot Daisy

Melampodium leucanthum
A mounding long-lived perennial, reaching up to 1.5 x 2 feet, that is native to the western U.S. ( from northwest Arizona to central Colorado to central Kansas; south to northwest Mexico to central Texas ). It is found on dry grassland in the wild.
The linear to lance-shaped leaves, up to 2 inches long, are gray-green.
The fragrant, white flowers, up to 1 inches across, are borne all summer long. Up to 50 flower heads may appear at a time on a plant.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 in full sun on sandy, very well drained soil that is mulched in gravel. It does not like clay. It is extremely heat tolerant.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

Pineapple Guava

Feijoa sellowiana
Also called Acca sellowiana, it is the lone species of Feijoa within the Myrtaceae family. It is a rapid growing, small tree, reaching a maximum size of 33 x 33 feet, that is native to high elevations in South America ( from Columbia to southern Brazil; south to Uruguay to northern Argentina. In cooler climates, it is more often found as a shrub, especially used as a hedge or screen.
The attractive leaves, up to 3 x 1.6 inches, are glossy deep green above, white felted beneath.
The white to pink ( with deep red stamens ) flowers are up to 1.6 inches across.
The edible flowers are often added to fruit salads.
The flowers attract hummingbirds.
They are followed by aromatic, oval fruits, up to 4 inches in length, are reddish-green. The flesh is white on the edible fruits. While some varieties are self-fertile, others need multiple plants for pollination.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 in full sun on light, well drained soil. It gains hardiness as it ages, older plants may
tolerate as low as 5 F ). It is known to grow in the British Isles as far north as western Scotland, however temperatures below 16 F will eliminate fruit production for that year. The Pineapple Guava requires hot summers for good fruit production.

* videos found on Youtube


* photo taken on Aug 15 2014 @ Rawlings Conservatory, Baltimore, MD


'Variegata'
Foliage is edged in white.

Perennial Forget-Me-Not

Cynoglossum

Cynoglossum nervosum
A bushy, upright perennnial, reaching up to 2.5 x 2 feet, that is native to the Himalayas.
The narrow-oblong or lance-shaped leaves are up to 12 inches in length.
The intense blue flowers are borne over a period up to 4 weeks during late spring.
Hardy zones 4 to 9 in full sun or partial shade on light, well drained soil.

Golden-Aster

Chrysopsis mariana ( Maryland Golden-Aster )
A vigorous perennial, reaching a maximum size of 3 x 3 feet, that is native to open woods and dry meadows the eastern U.S. ( from northwest Louisiana to southern Ohio to central New York State; south to far eastern Texas to southern Florida ). It is endangered in New York and Pennsylvania.
The lance-shaped or obovate leaves are up to 6 x 1.5 inches in size. The foliage is silvery.
The showy, bright yellow flowers, up to 2 inches across, are borne late summer to mid-autumn. The flowers are followed by fluffy seed heads.
Hardy zones 4 to 7 ( 8 & 9 for southern seed source ) in full sun to partial shade on dry, sandy to loamy, well drained soil. It is very tolerant of drought and extreme heat. Plants can be cut back during early summer for a shorter, sturdier habit. Propagation is from root division or seed.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photos taken on Sep 16 2016 @ Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, MD

* photos taken on Sep 18 2016 @ Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, MD

* historic archive photo


Chrysopsis villosa ( Hairy Golden-Aster )
Also called Heterotheca villosa. Similar to C. mariana but taller ( reaching up to 5 feet ) with less showy blooms. It is native to dry prairie in western and central North America ( from British Columbia to Edmonton, Alberta to southern Saskatchewan to southern Manitoba to Kenora, Ontario to central Wisconsin; south to northern Oregon to Colorado to Kansas to Indiana ).
The oblong leaves, up to 2 x 0.5 inches in size, are gray-green.
The bright yellow flowers, up to 1 inch wide, are borne during mid-summer.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun on sandy, well drained soil. Very drought tolerant.

* photo taken by Patrick J. Alexander @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


'Golden Sunshine'
Reaches up to 5 feet, bearing abundant, golden-yellow flowers.